August 27, 2013

FWM Fall 2013 Exhibitions, Events, and Lectures Schedule
 

Convergence: Declarations of Independence

Series of Public Lectures by Contemporary Artists

Cynthia Hopkins, Wednesday, September 11, at 6:30 pm
Kazumi Tanaka, Thursday, October 24 at 6:30 pm
 
For the PDF version, click here
 
The Fabric Workshop and Museum (FWM) presents Convergence: Declarations of Independence, a new, ongoing series of public lectures by contemporary artists during their initial site visit to the institution, prior to their FWM residency. This series intends to illustrate the various methods of artistic practice to the Philadelphia community by hosting talks that allow the audience access to the evolution of a work of art. This fall, FWM will welcome two artists, Cynthia Hopkins and Kazumi Tanaka.  Hopkins, who will give a performative talk on Wednesday, September 11, at 6:30 p.m., is a Brooklyn-based multi-instrumentalist and theater artist who writes, composes, sings, and collaborates with designers to create stage sets and costumes. Tanaka, who will speak on Thursday, October 24 at 6:30 p.m., is a Japanese-American sculptor who creates trompe l'oeil objects utilizing wood and other organic and found materials and who is based in Beacon, New York.  The Fabric Workshop and Museum will continue to host talks in the Convergence series over the course of the coming months; please check the Museum's website for upcoming event announcements.
 
About the Artists
Cynthia Hopkins is an internationally acclaimed musical performance artist who lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. Her multi-media performance works incorporate music, text, video, and theatrical design to create imaginative stories interweaving truth with outlandish fiction. She is best known for The Accidental Trilogy, a series of full-length pieces consisting of Accidental Nostalgia, which premiered in 2004 (2005 Bessie Award for Creation); Must Don’t Whip ‘Um in 2007 (2007 Bessie Award for Design); and The Success of Failure (or, The Failure of Success), which premiered in 2009 at the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, and St. Ann’s Warehouse in Brooklyn. In addition to her theater work, Hopkins was a founding member of the band Gloria Deluxe, which recorded eight full-length albums while active from 1999 to 2009. The band developed an enthusiastic following for its blend of folk, rock, blues and country music, touring as opening acts for legendary musicians David Byrne and Patti Smith. In addition to the many Bessie Awards won for The Accidental Trilogy, she is the recipient of a 2001 Obie Award, the 2007 Alpert Award in Theater, and a 2010 Guggenheim Fellowship. Hopkins’ work has been presented at venues across the world, including MASS MoCA; On the Boards; the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, Philadelphia Performing Arts Festival; the Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh; St. Ann’s Warehouse, Brooklyn; and Les Subsistances, Lyon, France.
 
Kazumi Tanaka (b. 1962, Osaka, Japan) graduated from Osaka University in 1985 before relocating to New York in 1987, where she studied sculpture at the New York Studio School (1987 – 1990). Employing both ancient and modern sculpting techniques, Tanaka creates intricate and conceptually complex works that often involve childhood memories of Japan and address cultural differences between Eastern and Western livelihoods. She has exhibited at museums and galleries around the world. Solo exhibitions include presentations at the Kent Gallery between 1995 and 2003; as well as shows at the New Museum of Contemporary Art, New York (1993); Beacon Project Space, Beacon, New York (2002); and Hudson Beach Glass Gallery, Beacon (2011). Tanaka’s work has been included in numerous group exhibitions, including The Return of the Cadavre Exquis, at the Drawing Center, New York (1993); A Labor of Love, at the New Museum of Contemporary Art (1996); The Quiet in the Land, at the Portland Institute of Contemporary Art at the Maine College of Art (1997); Aldrich Undercover, at the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum, Ridgefield, Connecticut (2009-2010); and Salem2Salem, at Neues Museum, Salem, Germany (2012). Most recently her work has been included in the group exhibition Silence, at Masters & Pelavin Gallery, New York (2012). Tanaka has participated in numerous residencies, including at the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, Skowhegan, Maine (1990); the United Society of Shakers, Sabbathday Lake, Maine (1996); in Salem, Germany (2010, 2012); Art Omi in New York (2013); and will complete an upcoming residency as part of a 2014 Visual Arts Fellowship at the Citivella Ranieri Center in Umbria, Italy. She lives and works in Beacon, New York.
 
 

Mario Ybarra, Jr.: Books Of Drawings, Beyond Our Dreams,

Blame Our Dads, Brains On Drugs, Better Off Dead

On view from August 30—Fall 2013

Reception: First Friday, October 4, 6:00–8:00 pm
Press & Members Preview: Artist talk by Mario Ybarra, Jr. at 5:30 pm
 
The Fabric Workshop and Museum (FWM) is pleased to debut an exhibition of new work by artist-in-residence Mario Ybarra, Jr., titled Books Of Drawings, Beyond Our Dreams, Blame Our Dads, Brains On Drugs, Better Off Dead, on view from Friday, August 30th through Fall 2013. On First Friday, October 4th, FWM will host a Reception for Ybarra, Jr.’s show, from 6:00–8:00 pm, as well as a Press & Members Preview, that will feature an Artist Talk at 5:30 pm.
 
Mario Ybarra, Jr.‘s sculpture, installations, and community-based projects examine the perspective and cultural touchstones of Mexican-Americans living in Southern California. Ybarra, Jr. strives to cultivate an “open dialogue with the public”—whether as aware participants or unassuming onlookers—in his work, including his socially-engaged artist group Slanguage, which he co-founded with Karla Diaz in 2002 in Wilmington, California.
 
A major part of Ybarra, Jr.’s work involves examining hidden histories of U.S. street culture through large-scale, mixed media installations. His collaboration with FWM serves as a vehicle for telling a creative, visual narrative of Ybarra, Jr.’s former street crew, established 23 years ago in 1990. Similar to the exhibition’s title, the crew’s name—identified by Ybarra, Jr.’s first graffiti tag, B.O.D.—can stand for many things and inspires many components of the FWM installation, such as wallpaper, jackets, a scarf, and sketchbooks. These artworks are housed within fragmented architectural structures that, when combined, can form a large shipping container, a common industrial sight at the Los Angeles Port, which is located close to Wilmington, California, where Mario Ybarra, Jr. was born and raised. At FWM, these structures simultaneously serve as an urban clubhouse, a museum, and pop-up shop. Funding for this project is provided by National Endowment for the Arts and LLWW Foundation, and the Board of Directors and Members of The Fabric Workshop and Museum (FWM).
 
About the Artist
Mario Ybarra, Jr. (b. 1972, Wilmington, CA) received an MFA from the University of California, Irvine (2001) and a BFA from Otis College of Art and Design, Los Angeles (1999). Recent solo exhibitions include Double Feature at Honor Fraser Gallery, Los Angeles (2013); Mario Ybarra Jr.: The Tio Collection at the Santa Barbara Contemporary Arts Forum (2012); Wilmington Good at the Cardi Black Box, Milan, Italy (2011); Silver and Blacks at Michael Janssen Gallery, Berlin, Germany (2010); Take Me Out…No Man Is An Island at the Art Institute of Chicago (2008); and Black Squirrel Society at Lehmann Maupin Gallery, New York (2008). Ybarra, Jr. has been included in such group exhibitions as Made in L.A., the Los Angeles Biennial organized by the Hammer Museum in collaboration with LAXART (2012); Invisible Cities at the Instituto Cervantes, Madrid, Spain (2010); the Whitney Biennial, New York (2008); Phantom Sightings: Art After the Chicano Movement at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), Los Angeles (2008); Prague Biennale 3 in Prague, Czech Republic (2007); The World as a Stage at the Tate Modern, London, UK, as well as the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston (2007); the California Biennial at the Orange County Museum of Art, Newport Beach (2006); and Alien Nation at the Institute of Contemporary Art, London, UK (2006).
 
In 2002, Mario Ybarra, Jr. and Karla Diaz founded Slanguage, a socially-engaged artist group headquartered in Wilmington, CA, who practice a three-pronged approach to art-making based on art education, community building, and the production of interactive exhibitions and performance projects. Slanguage organized Possible Worlds: Mario Ybarra, Jr., Karla Diaz, and Slanguage Studio Select from the Permanent Collections in collaboration with Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) and the Watts House Project, Los Angeles (2011).
 
Ybarra, Jr.’s work is held in such esteemed collections as the Museum of Contemporary Art San Diego and the Eileen and Peter Norton Foundation, Santa Monica. He has been awarded a Levitt Fellowship at Williams College, Williamstown, MA (2008); an Artist Residency at the Arhus Kunstbygning Centre for Contemporary Art in Denmark (2011); and an Artist-in-Residence at The Fabric Workshop and Museum (FWM), Philadelphia (2011-2013). Mario Ybarra, Jr. lives and works in Wilmington, CA, and is represented by Honor Fraser, Los Angeles, and Lehmann Maupin Gallery, New York and Hong Kong.
 
 

Beyond the Selvage: A History of Screen-printing

at The Fabric Workshop and Museum

September 13—Fall 2013

On view from September 13—Fall 2013
Reception: First Friday, October 4, 6:00–8:00 pm
 
The Fabric Workshop and Museum (FWM) presents Beyond the Selvage: A History of Screen-printing at The Fabric Workshop and Museum, an exhibition showcasing how the Apprentice Training Program and the Artist-in-Residence Program—two of the institution’s longest-running initiatives—expand the possibilities of fabric in contemporary art practice. Featuring silkscreen yardage designed and printed at FWM, Beyond the Selvage represents the most comprehensive selection from the Apprentice Training Program in over a decade—with work from 1978 to the present day—and highlights several prominent examples from the Artist-in-Residence Program. This exhibition celebrates the dynamic range of interests, skills, and inspirations that artists have brought to FWM in its 36-year-history through artwork that reaches beyond the “selvage,” a fabric’s traditional woven edge.
 
About the High School Apprentice Training Program
As one of the original programs of The Fabric Workshop and Museum, the High School Apprentice Training Program offers students the opportunity to learn all aspects of hand screen-printing on fabric. In FWM's professional studios, students design and print their own fabric yardage and assist staff in the production of artist residency projects. Hand screen-printing is an art form as well as an industrial skill, and the program is designed to provide students with new tools for artistic expression and self-empowerment.
 
Students from the Philadelphia area are encouraged to apply to the High School Apprentice Training Program. In two or three afternoons over 12 weeks, high school apprentices design and print a one-color repeat yardage, and assist in all areas of the studio. For high school students, the apprenticeship is job-training as well as an educational experience, and students earn minimum wage for their time. Students also receive portfolio and career guidance from artists and studio staff.
 
The High School Apprentice Training Program was created to provide excellent art education for teenagers from diverse economic and cultural backgrounds, with the specific goal of offering an opportunity unavailable to students in their schools. FWM's objective is to complement school resources and improve art education for high school age students in the Philadelphia region.
 
About the College and Post-Graduate Apprentice Training Program
Students from Philadelphia and from other U.S. or international locations are invited to apply to the College and Post-Graduate Apprentice Training Program. A full-time and part-time program exists for these apprentices to advance their own art training while also participating in the daily operations of the studio. Students design and print a one-color and a three-color repeat yardage, and assist with projects in the studio, archives, and administrative departments. Students also have the opportunity to give a short lecture on their own work, visit area cultural organizations, and work with visiting artists-in-residence. FWM actively recruits a diverse pool of candidates, with a special emphasis on international students. Recent apprentices have come to FWM from nearly every state in the U.S., as well as from Japan, Ghana, South Korea, Germany, Finland, Kenya, Great Britain, France, India, and China.
 
 

Multiplied: Editioned Works from The Fabric Workshop and Museum

September 9—Fall 2013

On view from September 9—Fall 2013
Reception: First Friday, October 4, 6:00–8:00 pm
 
The Fabric Workshop and Museum (FWM) presents the group exhibition Multiplied: Editioned Works from The Fabric Workshop and Museum. Throughout the history of the institution, Artists-in-Residence have collaborated with the studio staff to create a broad array of multiples that embody FWM's spirit of innovation and experimentation in artistic practices. Multiplied features editioned objects ranging in materials and dimension—such as dolls, lamps, sculptural objects, and scarves—that are as diverse as the esteemed artists themselves: Daniel Arsham, Ecke Bonk, Moe Brooker, Robert Chambers, Dale Chihuly, Jim Drain, Hachivi Edgar Heap-of-Birds, Mary Heilmann, Tommy Joseph, Jiha Moon, Kiki Smith, and Robert Venturi.
 
About the Artist-in-Residence Program
The Fabric Workshop and Museum (FWM) invites contemporary artists to create new work using experimental materials and techniques. This internationally acclaimed Artist-in-Residence Program hosts emerging and established regional, national, and international contemporary artists who have a demonstrated commitment to innovation and exploration. To that end, FWM supports artistic experimentation by providing honorariums and materials to artists, and employing its facilities and staff to address their creative needs.
 
Artists-in-residence are drawn from all disciplines, including painting, sculpture, architecture and design, conceptual and installation art, performance, and video. Working collaboratively with FWM's staff of printers and technicians, artists are introduced to new techniques, materials, and resources, and are thus able to realize projects that would not otherwise be possible. Through this collaborative creative process, artists stretch the boundaries not only of their own work, and of the creative possibility of the various media, but also of the larger development of contemporary art.
 
 

A Riot of Color: The Fabric Workshop and Museum

in collaboration with Ruth Fine

September 13—Fall 2013

On view from September 13—Fall 2013
Reception: First Friday, October 4, 6:00–8:00 pm
 
The Fabric Workshop and Museum (FWM) presents A Riot of Color: The Fabric Workshop and Museum in collaboration with Ruth Fine. “Starting with Fabric, Branching into Everything”: this title of a 2003 New York Times article about The Fabric Workshop and Museum describes the breadth of this unique institution. Founded in 1977 by Marion Boulton Stroud, FWM has facilitated extraordinary work by scores of artists working in a wide variety of materials including steel, copper, brass and aluminum; live flowers; clay; video and sound; polyurethane and silicone rubber; wood and paper; horse hair and hog intestine. This Riot of Color window display returns to the FWM’s origins to reveal the brilliant range of work artists have created there within the tradition of printed textiles. Included are designs by Harry Anderson, Edna Andrade, Ed Baynard, James Carpenter, Tony Costanzo, Roy DeForest, Richard DeVore, Frank Faulkner, Howard Finster, Viola Frey, David Gilhooly, Renée Green, Diane Itter, Jun Kaneko, Steve Keister, Ken Dawson Little, Lysiane Luong,Phillip Maberry,Kim MacConnel, Maisin Artists of Papua New Guinea, Lynn Mandelbaum, Virgil Marti, James Melchert, Mineo Mizuno, Carmen Oquendo, Judy Rifka, Patrick Siler, Kiki Smith, Lizbeth Stewart, Will Stokes, Jr., Richard Tuttle, Robert Venturi, Nami Yamamoto, and Betty Woodman.
 
About the Artist
Ruth Fine is a curator and writer based in Philadelphia. Formerly the Curator of Modern Prints and Drawings and then of Special Projects in Modern Art, both at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., Fine conceived and administered The Dorothy and Herbert Vogel Collection: Fifty Works for Fifty States project, assisting the collectors in making gifts to one museum in each of the fifty United States. She is on the Board of the Fabric Workshop and Museum, where she has organized two exhibitions; and she chairs the Roy Lichtenstein Foundation Board. As curator of the National Gallery’s 1994 exhibition The Prints of Roy Lichtenstein she coordinated the Lichtenstein print catalogue raisonné which accompanied that show. Fine also has organized exhibitions focused on American artists including Romare Bearden, Mel Bochner, Helen Frankenthaler, Sam Gilliam, Jasper Johns, John Marin, and Georgia O’Keeffe. A painter and printmaker, Fine has published several books with Claire Van Vliet’s Janus Press in Vermont which are in museum and library collections throughout the world, among them, the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. Fine attended the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, received her B.F.A. from the Philadelphia College of Art (now the University of the Arts) and her M.F.A. from the University of Pennsylvania.
 
 

Sarah Sze, FWM Artist-in-Residence

Friday, December 13, 2013–Sunday, April 6, 2014

Friday, December 13, 2013–Sunday, April 6, 2014
Reception: Friday, December 13, 2013

For Sarah Sze’s residency, FWM will organize the first major solo exhibition of her work in the Philadelphia-area and will produce an accompanying scholarly publication. The artist creates immense and intricate site-specific works that are akin to drawings in space, manipulating architectural space to profoundly affect the way it is viewed. Sze represented the United States in the 2013 Venice Biennale. Please check the Museum's website for upcoming event announcements.
 
Funding for this exhibition is provided by The Pew Center for Arts & Heritage through the Philadelphia Exhibitions Initiative, National Endowment for the Arts, and the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation, and the Board of Directors and Members of The Fabric Workshop and Museum (FWM).
 
About the Artist
Sarah Sze has exhibited at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; Serpentine Gallery, London; Museum of Modern Art, New York; Museum of Contemporary Art, Tokyo; High Museum of Art, Atlanta; and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Sze’s work has been featured in solo exhibitions at the Institute of Contemporary Art, London; Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; Malmo Könsthall, Sweden; Asia Society, New York; and the Cartier Foundation, Paris. Her work has also been featured internationally at the 48th International Art Exhibition – la Biennale di Venezia, 10th Biennale de Lyon, 5th Liverpool Biennial, 25th São Paulo Biennial, 1st Berlin Biennial, the 2000 Whitney Biennial, and the 1999 Carnegie International. She has also received critical acclaim for public commissions at New York City’s High Line; Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge; and the Public Art Fund, New York. Born in Boston in 1969, Sze received a BA from Yale University in 1991 and an MFA from the School of Visual Arts in 1997. She is a 2003 MacArthur Fellow.
 
(Biography from Sarah Sze: Triple Point US Pavilion 55th International Art Exhibition—La Biennale di Venezia. Organizer The Bronx Museum of the Arts, Bronx, NY, accessed August 20, 2013 <http://www.sarahszevenice2013.com/about/artist-sarah-sze>)
 
 

FWM Fall 2013 Exhibitions, Events, and Lectures

 
Exhibition & Reception:
Mario Ybarra, Jr.: Books Of Drawings, Beyond Our Dreams, Blame Our Dads, Brains On Drugs, Better Off Dead
On view from August 30—Fall 2013
Reception: First Friday, October 4, 6:00–8:00 pm
Press & Members Preview: Artist talk by Mario Ybarra, Jr. at 5:30 pm
 
Exhibition & Reception:
Multiplied: Editioned Works from The Fabric Workshop and Museum
On view from September 9—Fall 2013
Reception: First Friday, October 4, 6:00–8:00 pm
 
Public Lectures by Contemporary Artists:
Convergence: Declarations of Independence
Cynthia Hopkins: Wednesday, September 11, at 6:30 pm
 
Exhibition & Reception:
Beyond the Selvage: A History of Screen-printing at The Fabric Workshop and Museum
On view from September 13—Fall 2013
Reception: First Friday, October 4, 6:00–8:00 pm
 
Exhibition & Reception:
A Riot of Color: The Fabric Workshop and Museum in collaboration with Ruth Fine
On view from September 13—Fall 2013 Reception:
First Friday, October 4, 6:00–8:00 pm
 
Public Lectures by Contemporary Artists
Convergence: Declarations of Independence
Kazumi Tanaka: Thursday, October 24 at 6:30 pm
 
Exhibition & Reception:
Sarah Sze, FWM Artist-in-Residence
On view from Friday, December 13, 2013–Sunday, April 6, 2014
Reception: Friday, December 13, 2013
 
 
About The Fabric Workshop and Museum
The Fabric Workshop and Museum (FWM) is the only museum of its kind, offering internationally renowned artists the resources to create new work in experimental materials. Artists come from all media—including sculpture, installation, video, painting, ceramics, and architecture—and use FWM’s facilities and technical expertise to create works of art that they could not create on their own. Research, construction, and fabrication occur on-site in studios that are open to the public, providing visitors with the opportunity to see works of art from conception to completion. FWM’s permanent collections include not only complete works of art, but also material research, samples, prototypes, and photography and video of artists making and speaking about their work. Access to the creative process provides visitors with a point of entry into understanding challenging works of contemporary art. FWM offers an unparalleled experience to those young and old, including the most significant artists of our time, students, and the general public.
 
The programs of The Fabric Workshop and Museum are supported by Agnes Gund; Amy Stone, Art Ancora; The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts; The Arcadia Foundation; The Barra Foundation; Christian R. and Mary F. Lindback Foundation; Claneil Foundation; The Dedalus Foundation, Inc.; Dolfinger-McMahon Foundation; E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation; Edna W. Andrade Fund of The Philadelphia Foundation; The Honickman Foundation; Independence Foundation; Institute of Museum and Library Services; The Judith Rothschild Foundation; Knight Foundation; LEF Foundation; LLWW Foundation; Longwood Plantation Foundation, Inc.; Louis N. Cassett Foundation; Mondriaan Foundation; National Endowment for the Arts; New Millennium Charitable Foundation; The New York Community Trust; Nimoy Foundation; Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency; The Pew Center for Arts & Heritage through the Philadelphia Exhibitions Initiative; The Philadelphia Cultural Fund; PNC Foundation; PNC Arts Alive; Public Funds from the Netherlands Cultural Service; The Quaker Chemical Foundation; Samuel S. Fels Fund; Individual Trustee Discretionary Grant, of the W. Clement and Jessie V. Stone Foundation; Uplands Family Foundation; and the Board of Directors and Members of The Fabric Workshop and Museum.
 
For more information, or to request images, please contact Michele Bregande, Assistant to the Directors, at michele@fabricworkshopandmuseum.org, or 215.561.8888.
 
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