Virgil Marti, Bullies, 1992 (detail). Flourescent ink and rayon flock on Tyvek. 9 feet x 54 inches (274.3 x 137.2 cm). Andy Warhol, Cow Wallpaper (pink/yellow), 1966 (detail); refabricated for the Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh, 1994. Screenprint on paper. 120 x 240 inches. Courtesy of the Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh. Jenny Holzer, Inflammatory Essays, 1979-82. Offset print on paper. Sheet: 17 x 17 inches; overall: 120 x 260 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Cheim & Read, New York. Takashi Murakami, Jellyfish Eyes, 2002. Hand screenprint on paper. Roll: 180 x 27 inches; overall: 120 x 307 1/2 inches. Courtesy of Marianne Boesky Gallery, New York.
Virgil Marti, Bullies, 1992 (detail). Flourescent ink and rayon flock on Tyvek. 9 feet x 54 inches (274.3 x 137.2 cm).
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Andy Warhol, Cow Wallpaper (pink/yellow), 1966 (detail); refabricated for the Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh, 1994. Screenprint on paper. 120 x 240 inches. Courtesy of the Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh.

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Jenny Holzer, Inflammatory Essays, 1979-82. Offset print on paper. Sheet: 17 x 17 inches; overall: 120 x 260 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Cheim & Read, New York.

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Takashi Murakami, Jellyfish Eyes, 2002. Hand screenprint on paper. Roll: 180 x 27 inches; overall: 120 x 307 1/2 inches. Courtesy of Marianne Boesky Gallery, New York.
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On the Wall: Wallpaper and Tableau

May 9, 2003–September 13, 2003

Opening Reception:

Friday, May 9, 2003
5:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.



On the Wall: Wallpaper and Tableau is an exhibition of wallpapers by artists John Baldessari, Mike Bidlo, Adam Cvijanovic, Drew Dominick, Nicole Eisenman, General Idea, Robert Gober, Lonnie Graham, Rodney Graham, Richard Haas, Trenton Doyle Hancock, Jenny Holzer, Jim Isermann, Peter Kogler, Roy Lichtenstein, Virgil Marti, Jane Masters, Michael Mercil, Takashi Murakami, Paul Noble, Jorge Pardo, Francesco Simeti, Kiki Smith, Will Stokes, Do-Ho Sub, Rosemarie Trockel, Andy Warhol, and William Wegman and tableaus by artists Viola Frey, Renee Green, Trenton Doyle Hancock, Glenn Ligon, Carrie Mae Weems, and Rob Wynne.

This exhibition, curated by Marion Boulton Stroud, Founder/Artistic Director, The Fabric Workshop and Museum (FWM), is a companion exhibition to The RISD Museum's recent exhibition On the Wall: Wallpaper by Contemporary Artists and has been organized in conjunction with Judith Tannenbaum and The RISD Museum. A catalog documenting both exhibitions will be available summer 2003. The FWM exhibition features new works made in collaboration with FWM by artists Virgil Marti, Kiki Smith, Glenn Ligon, Will Stokes and Nicole Eisenman. Also included are works from FWM's collection such as The Apple of Adam's Eye (1993) by Carrie Mae Weems, Untitled (1999) an installation in FWM's entrance by Jorge Pardo, and Mise en Scene: Commemorative Toile (1992) by Renee Green. On the Wall: Wallpaper and Tableau also includes selections of historical wallpaper from the Philadelphia Museum of Art collection.

"On the Wall is an ambitious project that explores the boundaries between art and design. The crosspollination of functional and nonfunctional forms is a complex topic currently of vital interest to a new generation of American and multinational artists ... "
—Judith Tannenbaum

Artist Virgil Marti creates wallpaper as his primary artwork and is known for such work as Bullies (1992), wallpaper featuring high school bullies surrounded by a vibrant floral pattern, and Oscar Wilde (1995), an installation at the Eastern State Penitentiary in Philadelphia, PA. Along with Marti's Bullies, On the Wall: Wallpaper and Tableau features Lotus Wallpaper (2003), an installation commissioned by The RISD Museum in collaboration with the RISD Printmaking Department and the FWM. This work is inspired by the textile patterns of Japanese No robes, the history of decorative arts and pop culture of the 1960's and 70's.

Artists in this exhibition prove the vitality of wallpaper through masterfully executed works using repeat design and featuring recognizable imagery, narratives, historical commentary, photography and other elements. Wallpaper historically has a difficult role: "It should be interesting enough to be noticed, but not so striking that it detracts from the furnishings, artwork, and architectural features of a room." (Tannenbaum) On the Wall: Wallpaper and Tableau challenges the traditional role of wallpaper as background by presenting tableaus that integrate artists' wallpaper designs with artist-designed furniture, sculpture and artwork.