Richard Tuttle, in collaboration with The Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia. Pants, 1979. Pigment on bleached cotton muslin. 72 x 26 inches. Limited edition. Photo credit: Will Brown. Richard Tuttle, in collaboration with The Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia. “Extraordinary (M HC1)”, 2015. Hand-sewn yukata with obi,chusen-dyed cotton and silk. Yukata: 61 x 54 inches (154.9 x 137.2 cm); obi: 3.9 x 157.5 inches (10 cm x 4 m). Edition of 20. Collection of The Fabric Workshop and Museum. Photo credit: Will Brown. Richard Tuttle, in collaboration with The Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia. Both/And  Richard Tuttle Print and Cloth (installation view of “Extraordinary”), 2015. Hand-sewn yukata with obi, chusen-dyed cotton and silk. Yukata (men’s): 61 x 54 inches (154.9 x 137.2 cm); obi: 3.9 x 157.5 inches (10 cm x 4 m). Edition of 20. Yukata (women’s): 68 x 52 inches (172.7 x 132.0 cm); obi: 3.9 x 157.5 (10 cm x 4 m). Edition of 20. Collection of The Fabric Workshop and Museum. Photo credit: Cameron Blaylock. Richard Tuttle, in collaboration with The Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia. Both/And  Richard Tuttle Print and Cloth (installation view), 2015. Photo credit: Cameron Blaylock. Richard Tuttle, in collaboration with The Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia. The Thinking Cap, 1998. Pigment on cotton and stainless steel. 12 x 8.5 x 7.5 inches. Edition of 5; 24, 1998. Pine. 24 x 24 x 24 inches. Edition of 8. Photo credit: Will Brown. This installation view at The Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia of Both/And  Richard Tuttle Print and Cloth features work from Richard Tuttle: I Don’t Know . The Weave of Textile Language, exhibited at and organized by the Whitechapel Gallery, London, 2014. Photo credit: Cameron Blaylock. This installation view at The Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia of Both/And  Richard Tuttle Print and Cloth features work from Richard Tuttle: I Don’t Know . The Weave of Textile Language, exhibited at and organized by the Whitechapel Gallery, London, 2014. Photo credit: Cameron Blaylock. Richard Tuttle, Fiction Fish I, 7, 1992. Graphite and ribbon on cardboard and graphite line. 5 x 4 1/2 x 1 1⁄8 inches (12.7 x 11.4 x 2.9 cm), excluding line. Collection of Craig Robins, Miami. Richard Tuttle, Post-Whiteness III, 1994. Wood, metal, gauze, and nails; two parts. 25 x 32 x 2 3⁄4 inches (63.5 x 81.3 x 7 cm). Collection of Henry S. McNeil.  Richard Tuttle, The Present, 2004. Metal, cloth, paper, paint, and rope, with four colored lamps. Approximately 61 x 13 x 13 inches (155 cm x 33 cm x 33 cm). Galerie Ulrike Schmela, Berlin. Richard Tuttle, Clutter, 2008–12. Mixed media on mounted cardboard circles, on wood, on black cardboard circles; fifteen parts. 23 5⁄8 x 139 x 7 1⁄8 inches (60 x 353 x 18 cm). Collection of Gian Enzo Sperone, Switzerland. Richard Tuttle, Walking on Air, C10, 2009. Cotton with Rit dyes, grommets, and thread, in two horizontal panels. 23 x 123 inches (58.4 x 312.4 cm). Coleccion Juan Carlos Verme. Richard Tuttle, Looking for the Map 8, 2013–14. Fabric, wood, armature wire, Foamcore, paint, push pins, and straight pins. 93 x 48 x 48 inches (236.2 x 121.9 x 121.9 cm). Jacqueline Soffer, Nominee. This installation view at The Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia of Both/And  Richard Tuttle Print and Cloth features work from Richard Tuttle: A Print Retrospective, exhibited at and organized by the Bowdoin College Museum of Art, Brunswick, Maine, 2014. Photo credit: Cameron Blaylock. This installation view at The Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia of Both/And  Richard Tuttle Print and Cloth features work from Richard Tuttle: A Print Retrospective, exhibited at and organized by the Bowdoin College Museum of Art, Brunswick, Maine, 2014. Photo credit: Cameron Blaylock. This installation view at The Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia of Both/And  Richard Tuttle Print and Cloth features work from Richard Tuttle: A Print Retrospective, exhibited at and organized by the Bowdoin College Museum of Art, Brunswick, Maine, 2014. Photo credit: Cameron Blaylock. Richard Tuttle: I Don’t Know . The Weave of Textile Language book cover. Available at FWM Art Museum Shop. Cover image: Turbine Hall Commission, Tate Modern installation, October 14, 2014-April, 6 2015. Richard Tuttle Prints. Available at FWM Art Museum Shop. This book was published on the occasion of the exhibition Richard Tuttle: A Print Retrospective at the Bowdoin College Museum of Art, Brunswick, Maine, June 28 through October 19, 2014. Cover image: When Pressure Exceeds Weight VI, 2012. Courtesy Universal Limited Art Editions and the artist.
Richard Tuttle, in collaboration with The Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia. Pants, 1979. Pigment on bleached cotton muslin. 72 x 26 inches. Limited edition. Photo credit: Will Brown.
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Richard Tuttle, in collaboration with The Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia. “Extraordinary (M HC1)”, 2015. Hand-sewn yukata with obi,chusen-dyed cotton and silk. Yukata: 61 x 54 inches (154.9 x 137.2 cm); obi: 3.9 x 157.5 inches (10 cm x 4 m). Edition of 20. Collection of The Fabric Workshop and Museum. Photo credit: Will Brown.
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Richard Tuttle, in collaboration with The Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia. Both/And  Richard Tuttle Print and Cloth (installation view of “Extraordinary”), 2015. Hand-sewn yukata with obi, chusen-dyed cotton and silk. Yukata (men’s): 61 x 54 inches (154.9 x 137.2 cm); obi: 3.9 x 157.5 inches (10 cm x 4 m). Edition of 20. Yukata (women’s): 68 x 52 inches (172.7 x 132.0 cm); obi: 3.9 x 157.5 (10 cm x 4 m). Edition of 20. Collection of The Fabric Workshop and Museum. Photo credit: Cameron Blaylock.
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Richard Tuttle, in collaboration with The Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia. Both/And  Richard Tuttle Print and Cloth (installation view), 2015. Photo credit: Cameron Blaylock.
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Richard Tuttle, in collaboration with The Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia. The Thinking Cap, 1998. Pigment on cotton and stainless steel. 12 x 8.5 x 7.5 inches. Edition of 5; 24, 1998. Pine. 24 x 24 x 24 inches. Edition of 8. Photo credit: Will Brown.
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This installation view at The Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia of Both/And  Richard Tuttle Print and Cloth features work from Richard Tuttle: I Don’t Know . The Weave of Textile Language, exhibited at and organized by the Whitechapel Gallery, London, 2014. Photo credit: Cameron Blaylock.
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This installation view at The Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia of Both/And  Richard Tuttle Print and Cloth features work from Richard Tuttle: I Don’t Know . The Weave of Textile Language, exhibited at and organized by the Whitechapel Gallery, London, 2014. Photo credit: Cameron Blaylock.
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Richard Tuttle, Fiction Fish I, 7, 1992. Graphite and ribbon on cardboard and graphite line. 5 x 4 1/2 x 1 1⁄8 inches (12.7 x 11.4 x 2.9 cm), excluding line. Collection of Craig Robins, Miami.
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Richard Tuttle, Post-Whiteness III, 1994. Wood, metal, gauze, and nails; two parts. 25 x 32 x 2 3⁄4 inches (63.5 x 81.3 x 7 cm). Collection of Henry S. McNeil. 
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Richard Tuttle, The Present, 2004. Metal, cloth, paper, paint, and rope, with four colored lamps. Approximately 61 x 13 x 13 inches (155 cm x 33 cm x 33 cm). Galerie Ulrike Schmela, Berlin.
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Richard Tuttle, Clutter, 2008–12. Mixed media on mounted cardboard circles, on wood, on black cardboard circles; fifteen parts. 23 5⁄8 x 139 x 7 1⁄8 inches (60 x 353 x 18 cm). Collection of Gian Enzo Sperone, Switzerland.
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Richard Tuttle, Walking on Air, C10, 2009. Cotton with Rit dyes, grommets, and thread, in two horizontal panels. 23 x 123 inches (58.4 x 312.4 cm). Coleccion Juan Carlos Verme.
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Richard Tuttle, Looking for the Map 8, 2013–14. Fabric, wood, armature wire, Foamcore, paint, push pins, and straight pins. 93 x 48 x 48 inches (236.2 x 121.9 x 121.9 cm). Jacqueline Soffer, Nominee.
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This installation view at The Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia of Both/And  Richard Tuttle Print and Cloth features work from Richard Tuttle: A Print Retrospective, exhibited at and organized by the Bowdoin College Museum of Art, Brunswick, Maine, 2014. Photo credit: Cameron Blaylock.
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This installation view at The Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia of Both/And  Richard Tuttle Print and Cloth features work from Richard Tuttle: A Print Retrospective, exhibited at and organized by the Bowdoin College Museum of Art, Brunswick, Maine, 2014. Photo credit: Cameron Blaylock.
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This installation view at The Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia of Both/And  Richard Tuttle Print and Cloth features work from Richard Tuttle: A Print Retrospective, exhibited at and organized by the Bowdoin College Museum of Art, Brunswick, Maine, 2014. Photo credit: Cameron Blaylock.
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Richard Tuttle: I Don’t Know . The Weave of Textile Language book cover. Available at FWM Art Museum Shop. Cover image: Turbine Hall Commission, Tate Modern installation, October 14, 2014-April, 6 2015.
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Richard Tuttle Prints. Available at FWM Art Museum Shop. This book was published on the occasion of the exhibition Richard Tuttle: A Print Retrospective at the Bowdoin College Museum of Art, Brunswick, Maine, June 28 through October 19, 2014. Cover image: When Pressure Exceeds Weight VI, 2012. Courtesy Universal Limited Art Editions and the artist.
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Richard Tuttle:

Both/And Richard Tuttle Print and Cloth

May 15, 2015–Summer 2015

Opening Reception:
Friday, May 15, 2015 from 6:00 to 8:00 pm
 
Members Preview
Artist Discussion on Friday, May 15, 2015 at 5:30 pm
Please RSVP by Thursday, May 7, 2015 to reservations@fabricworkshopandmuseum.org
 
Family Program Event
FWM Family Jam: See, Sew, Sculpt!
Saturday, July 11, 2015 from 1:00pm–4:00pm
Space is limited for this workshop, please RSVP by clicking here, thank you.
 
 
“Art always comes from art.”
                 — Richard Tuttle
 
Press Release                   Press Images


The Fabric Workshop and Museum (FWM) proudly presents the Philadelphia premiere of Both/And  Richard Tuttle Print and Cloth. This unique, mulitfaceted installation of over five decades of work—from the mid-1960s to present—was conceived by Richard Tuttle, offering one of the most comprehensive experiences ever of this influential, contemporary American artist, who has a long history of collaboration with FWM, beginning in 1978 shortly after the Museum was founded by Artistic Director Marion Boulton Stroud. This installation will feature work from Tuttle’s two landmark textile and print surveys that originated in 2014: “Richard Tuttle: I Don’t Know . The Weave of Textile Language,” organized by Whitechapel Gallery in association with Tate Modern, London; and “Richard Tuttle: A Print Retrospective,” Bowdoin College Museum of Art, Maine, as well as the international premiere of new kimono work by the artist.

Currently an Artist-in-Residence at FWM, Tuttle’s new kimono work "Extraordinary" from this 2014-2015 residency will be on view in this major exhibition. The hand-sewn yukatas, or summer kimonos, are made of Sarashi cloth, a traditional Japanese cotton fabric. There are two editions of 20 plus 4 artist proofs, one for men and one for woman. The design and pattern in this edition of new work are Chusen dyed, a traditional Japanese method of dyeing using stencil paper, by Miyamoto Co., Ltd., in Osaka, Japan. The pattern in the woman’s yukata design is rotated 90 degrees when compared with the man’s design. As Tuttle stated in a conversation with the FWM studio staff, “By changing direction of the bars, dynamic energy is achieved.”

An exhibition brochure with an introduction by Marion Boulton Stroud, and contributions by FWM’s Artistic Advisor Mark Rosenthal and Curators Magnus af Petersens and Christina von Rotenhan, accompanies Tuttle’s dynamic work, which exists in the space between painting, sculpture, poetry, assemblage, drawing, and printmaking. The brochure checklist will pair the works of art on view with poems by the artist that are directly inspired by his pieces.



Bio

American, born 1941, lives in New York City and Abiquiu, New Mexico
Richard Tuttle, one of the most significant artists working today, has created an extraordinarily varied body of work that eludes historical or stylistic categorization. Following his studies at Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut (BA, 1963), he worked in New Mexico as an assistant to painter Agnes Martin. Tuttle’s first solo exhibition was in 1965 at the Betty Parsons Gallery in New York, and since that time his work has been shown in hundreds of one-person and group exhibitions and has become part of major private and public collections around the world. Early important exhibitions included a 1972 Projects series installation at the Museum of Modern Art, New York (1972), and a 1975 show at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York. Tuttle’s work was the subject of an exhibition at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia (2002), and was included in the Venice Biennale in 1997 and 2001. A recent retrospective of Tuttle's work, organized by the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (2005), traveled to the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York (2005-2006), the Des Moines Art Center (2006), the Dallas Museum of Art (2006), the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago (2006-2007), and the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (2007). Tuttle was the 2012-2013 Artist-in-Residence at the Getty Research Institute. In 2014, Tuttle was the subject of two landmark textile and print surveys: Richard Tuttle: I Don't Know . The Weave of Textile Language originally conceived as a 3-part project organized by Whitechapel Gallery in association with Tate Modern, London; and Richard Tuttle: A Print Retrospective at the Bowdoin College Museum of Art, Brunswick, Maine. The artist lives and works in Mount Desert, Maine; Abiquiu, New Mexico; and New York City.