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Leonardo Drew, Number 84, 2002 (detail). Paper. Dimensions vary with installation. Kiki Smith, Singing Siren, 2003. Cast plastic, motion sensor, sound device, audio 10 1/2 x 4 x 5 inches. Edition of 200, 12 AP, 4 PP.
Leonardo Drew, Number 84, 2002 (detail). Paper. Dimensions vary with installation.
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Kiki Smith, Singing Siren, 2003. Cast plastic, motion sensor, sound device, audio 10 1/2 x 4 x 5 inches. Edition of 200, 12 AP, 4 PP.
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Selections from the Permanent Collection II

June 17, 2005–November 5, 2005

Opening Reception:
Friday June 17th, 2005 at 6 p.m.


The Fabric Workshop and Museum (FWM) is pleased to present "Selections from the Permanent Collection II," the second in a series of exhibitions featuring a broad range of significant works produced in collaboration with FWM through its renowned Artists-in-Residence program. Works by internationally recognized artists including Leonardo Drew, Jim Hodges, Virgil Marti, Ernesto Neto, J. Morgan Puett and Mark Dion, Kiki Smith and more will be on view in two parts. FWM will feature the first part of the exhibition from June 18 through September 17, 2005 and the second part from October 8 through November 5, 2005.

Works featured in the exhibition include Leonardo Drew's Number 84 (2002), an installation of white paper casts of commonplace objects the artist collected from thrift stores, junkyards and off the street; Jim Hodges's You (1997), a delicate, lace-like sculptural veil of silk flowers; Virgil Marti's wallpaper from Oscar Wilde (1995), which adorned the walls of the Eastern State Penitentiary to commemorate the hundredth anniversary of the writer's imprisonment in England; and J. Morgan Puett and Mark Dion's Ideal Nurses' Uniform (2003), a uniform devised from the feedback of a focus group formed of retired, practicing and student nurses.

Also on view are examples ofFWM's artist multiples such as Emesto Neto's Cabeluda (2003) and Kiki Smith's Singing Siren (2003).

The Fabric Workshop and Museum is the only museum of its kind in the world, and the permanent collections document its unique history of artistic activity with contemporary artists. Numbering over 5,500 objects, FWM collections trace major movements in the field since 1977, and include significant works by past FWM Artists-in-Residence. This exhibition marks the second in a series of exhibitions–the first took place from March 6 through September 5, 2004–dedicated to FWM's permanent collections and to making the museum's collection more accessible to its audience and the general public. The series demonstrates the integral connection between the workshop and the museum, and FWM's contribution to contemporary art.

In addition to completed works of art, FWM collects and maintains an archive of documentation and process materials related to the artists-in-residence projects. The photographic, video, and process materials–some of which will also be on view–are available for research, and provide a valuable window into the conceptual and technical development of contemporary artworks.