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Jiha Moon discussing her works at The Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia. 2010.
Jiha Moon discussing her works at The Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia. 2010.
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Jiha Moon: Artist Interview

Artist: Jiha Moon

Jiha Moon’s delicate yet powerfully, brilliantly colorful works are layered both physically and with meaning, reflecting her life as an artist and mother in Atlanta, as well as a daughter of Korea. Moon often uses Hanji paper, a type of mulberry paper that is a traditional Korean medium. We tend to think of paper as a impermanent material, yet mulberry paper has played an important role in Asia because of its durability. Traditionally handmade in winter from bark of the mulberry bush gathered in the autumn, it has been used in China, Japan, and Korea to wrap medicine and food, to paper walls, and to make books. It is a lovely material, strong yet soft and delicate. Combined with mulberry paper are materials influenced by her residency at the FWM: embroidery, hand screen-printed silk organza, and sections of her mother’s wedding dress. Moon’s imagery too is rooted in both ancient and modern Asia and America. Traditional silk painting imagery vies with anime characters and other contemporary emblems in the creation of dense and personal narratives.