01 02 03

Ryan Trecartin. Sibling Topics (section a) (excerpt), 2009. HD video. 51:26.
Ryan Trecartin. Plaza Point, 2009–10. Unique sculptural theater. Dimensions variable. Trill-ogy Comp, 2009. Three looping HD videos. KCorealNC.K (section a). 33:05. P.opular Sky (section ish). 43:51. Sibling Topics (section a). 51:26. Ryan Trecartin. Access Quad, 2009–10. Unique sculptural theater, four looping HD videos. Dimensions variable. Ready (Re
Ryan Trecartin. Sibling Topics (section a) (excerpt), 2009. HD video. 51:26.
x
Ryan Trecartin. Plaza Point, 2009–10. Unique sculptural theater. Dimensions variable. Trill-ogy Comp, 2009. Three looping HD videos. KCorealNC.K (section a). 33:05. P.opular Sky (section ish). 43:51. Sibling Topics (section a). 51:26.
x
Ryan Trecartin. Access Quad, 2009–10. Unique sculptural theater, four looping HD videos. Dimensions variable. Ready (Re'Search Wait'S). 26:49. Roamie Vie: History Enchancement (Re'Search Wait'S). 28:23. The Re'Search (Re'Search Wait'S). 40:09. Temp Stop (Re'Search Wait'S). 11:47.
x

Ryan Trecartin

Ryan Trecartin’s complex multiroom video installation provides an assault to the senses, as if natives of another, closely parallel world were making art for us. Visual, linguistic, and temporal distortions come fast and furious. These distortions and parallels are often punning, frequently grating, and occasionally poignant. Mostly filmed in a loose, kinetic style, his videos feature characters who usually speak toward us, that is, toward the camera, but maybe not to us—they may be talking to themselves, or other characters, or us. The sets are almost not sets: maybe an apartment, a pool, a hallway, or sometimes ludicrously setlike depictions of, say, an airplane. The apartment is just off somehow, whether through its coloring or the holes in the walls . . . Language and image twist and pun upon themselves. Why do so many people in Trecartin’s videos have one discolored tooth? The tooth is blue. They are, it seems, Bluetooth enabled.

As one character says, “Surrender, Sir Render.” Trecartin’s rendering is done with the help of a coterie of friends and collaborators whose vocalizations and mannerisms artfully prance on the verge of annoying. The parallel world they are talking from is clearly the media universe of a generation nurtured on MTV videos, but there is more than that. The act of creation, the complexity of making collaborative art and launching it into the world to be talked about by people who have only half-watched it, the jargon and defensiveness of most art-world communication: those inform this work as well. Any artist’s work is the product of his own world, his own unique environment. The difficulty of jumping the track from one’s own world to the wider world is made stutteringly, jarringly clear in Trecartin’s videos.

Bio
Born 1981, Webster Texas. Lives and works in Los Angeles.
Ryan Trecartin emerged from the 2000s as an innovator of ecstatic new frontiers in art and cinema. His influence has grown within the art world and among a broader, intergenerational set of thinkers and cultural consumers. The narratives in his stream-of-consciousness, montage-heavy video pieces do not follow a linear progression, but despite the sense of extreme chaos, adhere to their own circuitous logic.

Born in Texas and raised in Ohio, Trecartin has lived and worked in Providence, New Orleans, Philadelphia, Miami, and Los Angeles. Any Ever is his non-sequential, seven-part body of work completed in 2010. It has been exhibited in its entirety at MoMA PS1, New York (2011), Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami (2011), The Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles (2010), and The Power Plant, Toronto (2010). In October 2011, Any Ever will be presented at ARC/Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris. Trecartin has participated in numerous international biennials including the Singapore Biennial (2011), Gwangju Biennial (2010), Liverpool Biennial (2010) and Whitney Biennial (2006).

In 2009 he was the recipient of the Jack Wolgin Fine Art Prize from the Tyler School of Art at Temple University in Philadelphia, and the Calvin Klein Collection New Artist of the Year Award at Rob Pruitt’s First Annual Art Awards at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York.