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Jiha Moon, in collaboration with The Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia. Springfield III—Butterfly Dream (detail), 2010. Hand screen print on silk organza, hand embroidery, acrylic, and collage with Hanji paper. 37.5 x 33.5 inches (95.3 x 85.1 cm). Jiha Moon, in collaboration with The Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia. Rota (detail), 2010. Wood, silk, artificial peaches, and paper. 27.5 x 35.5 inches (69.9 x 90.2 cm). Jiha Moon, in collaboration with The Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia. All Kinds of Everything (detail), 2010. Acrylic paint on silk organza, collage with Hanji paper, and custom stretcher bar. 27.5 x 35.5 inches (69.9 x 90.2 cm).
Jiha Moon, in collaboration with The Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia. Springfield III—Butterfly Dream (detail), 2010. Hand screen print on silk organza, hand embroidery, acrylic, and collage with Hanji paper. 37.5 x 33.5 inches (95.3 x 85.1 cm).
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Jiha Moon, in collaboration with The Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia. Rota (detail), 2010. Wood, silk, artificial peaches, and paper. 27.5 x 35.5 inches (69.9 x 90.2 cm).
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Jiha Moon, in collaboration with The Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia. All Kinds of Everything (detail), 2010. Acrylic paint on silk organza, collage with Hanji paper, and custom stretcher bar. 27.5 x 35.5 inches (69.9 x 90.2 cm).
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Jiha Moon

Jiha Moon’s delicate yet powerfully, brilliantly colorful works are layered both physically and with meaning, reflecting her life as an artist and mother in Atlanta, as well as a daughter of Korea. Moon often uses Hanji paper, a type of mulberry paper that is a traditional Korean medium. We tend to think of paper as a impermanent material, yet mulberry paper has played an important role in Asia because of its durability. Traditionally handmade in winter from bark of the mulberry bush gathered in the autumn, it has been used in China, Japan, and Korea to wrap medicine and food, to paper walls, and to make books. It is a lovely material, strong yet soft and delicate. Combined with mulberry paper are materials influenced by her residency at the FWM: embroidery, hand screen-printed silk organza, and sections of her mother’s wedding dress. Moon’s imagery too is rooted in both ancient and modern Asia and America. Traditional silk painting imagery vies with anime characters and other contemporary emblems in the creation of dense and personal narratives.

These narratives are animated and enlivened by the dialogue between painting styles and the interaction of representational and abstract passages. This is the stylistic and formal manifestation of Moon’s cultural background; her paintings’ complex visual environments are analogous to her own experience of living in two worlds simultaneously.

Bio
South Korean, born 1973. Lives and works in Atlanta.
Jiha Moon earned degrees from Korea and Ewha Universities and completed MA and MFA programs at the University of Iowa, School of Art and Art History in 2001 and 2002, respectively. Her work has been shown at the International Print Center, White Columns, Asia Society, Japanese American National Museum, and The Drawing Center, as well as at venues in Germany, Korea, and others throughout the United States. She has held residencies at Omi International Arts Center, Singapore Tyler Print Institute, the Henry Luce III Center for the Arts and Religion, and the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts. Moon conflates Eastern and Western influences by combining traditional Korean materials, subject matter, and symbols with reference to American pop culture. She layers materials and meaning in a signature painting style.